A Roman road in the Venice lagoon

Venice wasn’t always what it is. Initially, a few thousand years ago, there wasn’t that much water. Back then the Romans went where there are gaps today. His remains were submerged for a long time. That is why the discovery of a Roman road in the Venetian lagoon is the delight of explorers.

A Roman road in the Venice lagoon indicates that a settlement may have existed at this point.
A Roman road in the Venice lagoon indicates that a settlement may have existed at this point.
I go underwater

These are the researchers at the Institute for Marine Sciences (ISMAR) in Venice. They found the road sunk in the city’s lagoon. They publish it in Scientific Reports.

What does that mean? That there were extensive settlements there perhaps centuries before the founding of Venice, in the 5th century, everything was different in Roman times. Large parts of today’s Venetian lagoon were accessible by land. Roman artifacts have been found on the islands of the lagoon and in the waterways. But the extent of the human occupation there is unclear.

Not only one Roman road was found in the Venetian lagoon. ISMAR researcher Fantina Madricardo and her colleagues have found out more. There are 12 archaeological structures fringed at 1,140 meters to the northeast. The one in the lagoon is called the Canal de Treporti. The structures were up to 2.7 meters high and 52.7 meters long.

Venice was different at a different time.  At first it was less submerged.
Venice was different at a different time. At first it was less submerged.
A submerged harbor

Other evidence was found in previous studies. Cobblestones, for example. They were like the Romans in building roads. The structures could be lined up along a Roman road.

On the Treporti Canal there are four other structures that are up to four meters high. In total, they are 134.8 meters long. Something can be deduced from its extent and dimensions. It is believed that the largest of these structures is a possible port structure. Like a dock.

There may have been a permanent settlement on the Treporti Canal during Roman times. The road must have connected to a larger Roman road network in the region.

Click to rate this entry!
(Votes: 0 Average: 0)
Share!

Leave a Comment