The first drone to kill with artificial intelligence

You will know this. Before, where did you see a drone that decided to kill itself? Right, in the cinema. Although that is not the case Terminatorbut real life. The warning came from the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. You mentioned the first drone that was used to kill with artificial intelligence. It would be Turkish manufacture.

The first drone to kill with artificial intelligence can transform the military landscape.
The first drone to kill with artificial intelligence can transform the military landscape.
State of the art weapon

The Bulletin publishes the “Last Judgment Clock” report annually. It deals with assessing nuclear threats, climate change and disruptive technologies. He refers to a recent report by the UN panel of experts on Libya.

It’s the STM Kargu-2 drone – (autonomous weapon made in Turkey). He was able to “hunt retreating soldiers who were loyal to the Libyan General Khalifa Haftar” from a distance and to make compromises.

During the year the general’s troops withdrew. But the Kargu-2 means something perhaps even more significant around the world. “It’s a new chapter in autonomous weapons. They would kill people based on artificial intelligence.

It would be the first case of autonomous weapons to kill.
It would be the first case of autonomous weapons to kill.
Possible risk?

The Kargu is a “drifting” drone. You can use machine learning based object classification to pick and attack targets. Has swarm skills development. That would allow 20 drones to work together. Who Said Skynet? The UN report describes the Kargu-2 as a deadly autonomous weapon.

Its maker shows the weapon’s “anti-personnel” capabilities in a video. It shows him falling steeply towards a target in the midst of a group of mannequins

Steven Hawking and Elon Musk want to ban these weapons. The first artificial intelligence killing drone could not distinguish between civilians and soldiers. Others say they will be crucial in warding off threats like swarms of drones. Newsletter in an article signed by Zachary Kallenborn. The bulletin says it can actually reduce the risk to civilians. It would make fewer mistakes than human-operated weapon systems. Are we sure of that?

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