The real birth of the internet

It was 1969. Professor Leonard Kleinrock was in a laboratory at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), USA. The almanac said October 29th. I was trying to do something that had never been done before. He wanted to connect to a computer 600 kilometers away. And he achieves it. That was the real birth of the internet.

Leonard Kleinrock, participant in the true birth of the Internet in 1969, along with the computer that started it all.
Leonard Kleinrock, a participant in the true birth of the Internet in 1969, along with the computer that started it all.
Connect universities

In the laboratory, Kleinrock was responsible for a Sigma 7 SDS computer from the 1960s. This Sigma 7 was connected to one switch (Switch) the size of a refrigerator. And this, in turn, was connected to the AT&T telephone line. This system was the first node on the network called Arpanet, the forerunner of the Internet.

The Ministry of Defense was responsible for advanced research projects. Harp, for its acronym in English. Arpa was looking for a way that researchers in one location could access computers in another.

In 1962, Professor Leonard Kleinrock developed the theory of “data packet switching”. It is the technology that powers the internet today. The system enables data to be exchanged between computers. Files jump from link to link until one becomes available or wait for one to be shared.

Kleinrock was a professor at UCLA until 1969. Therefore, ARPA selected UCLA to install the first Arpanet node this September. The second switch o The node was installed at the Stanford Research Institute. It was 600 kilometers north of UCLA.

At SRI, programmer Bill Duval was waiting to confirm the action. There was an SDS 940 computer in his lab that was connected to the second in the same way Switch, also the size of a refrigerator. In order for computers to communicate with one another, UCLA scientists had to type in the word LOG.

The ARPANET network was set up to facilitate the use of data between universities.
The ARPANET network was set up to facilitate the use of data between universities.

UCLA sent the letter L and made it to SRI. The same thing happened with the O. But when UCLA sent the letter G, “the SRI computer crashed,” recalls Kleinrock. The first word sent over the internet was LO. About an hour after UCLA sent “LO”, it was able to send the entire word “LOG”.

visionary

Three months before the historic broadcast, Kleinrock had said that computer networks were still in their infancy. “But as they grow and become more sophisticated, we will likely see the proliferation of ‘public computer services’. They will serve individual homes and offices across the country,” he predicted. By 1972, Arpanet had connected 37 computers, according to the SRI. In later years scientists added more and more knots.

The network has not disappeared, but has evolved and became the Internet (Internet), explains Kleinrock. But the real birth of the Internet came that night in the transmission of a single word.

Click to rate this entry!
(Votes: 0 Average: 0)
Share!

Leave a Comment