The smart pillow that spies on you

Have you ever worked in a company that was suffocatingly oppressive? If you’re like the author of this article, the answer is yes. And if so, you will understand how the employees at Hebo Technology in Hangzhou, China, felt. They were given a pillow for their chairs that theoretically monitored their health. The smart pillow that spies on you.

Hidden Spy

It was an alleged study of the product. The devices should monitor his health. Very soon, the workers found that they were actually spying on them. The pillow was supposed to help hold a person’s bad posture in the chair. It could measure heart rate and breathing to show how tired you are. The truth of the matter was that it was sending information to the supervisors about the periods of time the employee was absent from work.

The smart pillow that was spying on you was supposedly placed for the benefit of the staff.
The smart pillow that was spying on you was supposedly placed for the benefit of the staff.

The employees at Hebo Technology Company in Hangzhou discovered that something was wrong. The company’s HR manager started asking questions about long breaks and early vacation.

The situation raised questions about data protection and transparency in the workplace. There is now an online debate about the limits of corporate surveillance. This was revealed by a contributor in a post posted on 19lou, a lifestyle forum, late last year. Soon her story went viral.

A manager asked him about the half-hour breaks he had taken at work. He also threatened to cut his annual bonus for alleged laziness. The smart pad that was spying on you did its real job.

What could it mean? It means all the evidence is on the pillow and my boss knows it! Going to work is like being in jail: the feeling of being watched all the time. Who actually works productively every minute and second in the office? “Wrote the Hebo employee.

In practice, the pillow was used to count the minutes the staff was not glued to their chair.
In practice, the pillow was used to count the minutes the staff was not glued to their chair.
The company is defending itself

The company warned the HR manager against disseminating participant data without permission. However, the company’s CEO Zhang Biyong disagreed. He defended the manager’s right to know where the workers are.

“If they are not in their seats, we cannot collect the data,” Zhang said of the process. The company designs so-called health devices discreethow to install it on mattresses to measure heart rate. The company defends that this obligation was for the benefit of its employees.

But like you, dear reader, the company’s employees did not believe him.

Click to rate this entry!
(Votes: 0 Average: 0)
Share!

Leave a Comment