The unusual alignment of planets

It is an amazing experience. To see the planets of the solar system arranged in a line is unique. The unusual alignment of planets will be visible very soon.

The unusual alignment of planets will be the astronomical event of the month.
The unusual alignment of planets will be the astronomical event of the month.

Perspective trick

It will be from the middle of the month. In the northern hemisphere, Saturn, Mars, Venus and Jupiter will be visible in a near-perfect planetary alignment. It will happen in the sky before dawn. The alignment begins to form around April 17. However, it will be most visible on the morning of April 20.

If conditions are good, you should be able to make out the four planets lined up in a celestial row. Jupiter’s proximity to the horizon may make it a little difficult to distinguish. Saturn, Mars and Venus have been grouping together since late March. But it won’t be until mid-April that Jupiter will join the party.

A few days later, around April 23, the alignment will be even more spectacular. They will be joined by the Moon. Of course, this is only valid from Earth’s skies. Any perceived alignment is just a trick of perspective, depending on where and when you are in space. But planetary alignments are an amazing thing to witness.

Soon the Moon will join the party.
Soon the Moon will join the party.

Major event

The unusual alignment of planets is just the beginning. what else comes next? On June 24, all the other planets in the solar system (Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus) will come together in an even greater planetary alignment. Although binoculars or a telescope will be needed to view Neptune and Uranus. The alignment will also extend over a larger section of the sky. And this will make it difficult to discern or photograph.

Despite these challenges, major planetary alignments like this one, visible to the human eye, are very, very rare. They have only occurred three times since 2005. “We don’t always have this opportunity,” he told WordsSideKick.com astronomy educator Michelle Nichols. She works with the Adler Planetarium in Chicago.

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