The work Leonardo Da Vinci did not model

All the news about Leonardo Da Vinci arouses passions. His own life is the subject of much speculation. Even his biographers have often contradicted his life. It is not uncommon for the same to be the case with his works and others attributed to him. For this reason, there is talk nowadays of the ultimate solution to an artistic controversy. It’s about the work that Leonardo Da Vinci didn’t sculpt: the bust of Flora.

The work that Leonardo Da Vinci did not carve, the bust of Flora.
The work that Leonardo Da Vinci did not carve, the bust of Flora.
A hundred years of doubt

It’s a controversy that has lasted for more than a century. It deals with the authorship of the Flora bust exhibited in Berlin’s Bode Museum. There was a lot of doubt at the time, although there was no precise evidence. It’s finally done. And the final conclusion is that it wasn’t the work of Leonardo Da Vinci, in short.

“It’s a plan, it’s a joke,” said the General Director of the Royal Museums of Berlin. He defended himself then. It happens that criticism rained down for buying a fake. But Wilhelm Bode didn’t move an inch. He never gave up his guess. The sculpture he acquired in 1909 was a still unknown production by the great Renaissance master Leonardo da Vinci. And he was very proud to show it.

Da Vinci's genius led to the creation of great works.  However, this is not the case with the controversial bust.
Da Vinci’s genius led to the creation of great works. However, this is not the case with the controversial bust.
Science speaks

But after that, a hundred years and numerous controversies passed. A group of scientists led by a researcher from the CNRS (French National Research Center) was commissioned. And he only proved once and for all that the German scholar was wrong.

The work that Leonardo Da Vinci did not chisel is the so-called wax bust of Flora. And it recently underwent radiocarbon dating. This finally gives an accurate date and an undeniable result. The work was done in the 19th century, almost 300 years after Da Vinci’s death. This is reported by the CNRS in a statement.

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