Why can’t we support certain sounds?

Someone is making a chewing noise … and we will not tolerate it. It’s terrible to our senses. Why can’t we support certain sounds? In the mirror neuron system is the answer. This was revealed by US scientists.

Why can't we support certain sounds?  Science explains it.
Why can’t we support certain sounds? Science explains it.
I hate the noise

What affects people with misophonia? Misophony is the hatred of sound. These are usually the oral noises: of someone chewing, breathing, or talking. That is, related to the activity of the mouth or throat.

Misophonia can trigger strong physical or emotional responses. To others, they might be viewed as exaggerated. For example, the reaction may be a slight feeling of disgust and fear. Even panic and the urge to get out of the situation. It is believed that between 6% and 20% of people are affected.

So far, misophony was considered a sound processing disorder. However, the study suggests something new. Says there is some kind of abnormal communication between the auditory cortex and the ventral premotor cortex areas. These are responsible for moving the face, mouth and throat.

“This happens to people with misophonia. There is abnormal communication between the auditory and motor regions of the brain. It could be described as an overly sensitive connection, ”said lead author Dr. Sukhbinder Kumar. He works with the University of Newcastle. He added that it is the first time that such a connection has been identified in the brain for this disease.

These reactions may seem excessive to other people.
These reactions may seem excessive to other people.
Cells learn

They found a similar pattern of communication between the visual and motor regions. That said, misophony can also be triggered by something visual. Why can’t we support certain sounds?

“Apparently this activates something called a ‘mirror system’. It helps us process other people’s movements by activating our own brain in a similar way. As if we were making this movement ourselves,” said Kumar.

These nerve cells are responsible for faster learning through imitation. Especially in the early stages of life. Mirror neuron disorder is believed to be a possible cause of some neurological disorders. For example, those on the autism spectrum. Dr. Kumar says that some people with misophonia can reduce their symptoms by mimicking the action the sound creates. This can help regain a sense of control.

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